Fire Ants Colorado Springs CO

Fire ants range in size from 1/8 to 1/3 of an inch, but their bite feels like they're much bigger in Colorado Springs.

CONCEPT PEST CONTROL
(719) 473-3590
2573 E PIKES PEAK AVENUE APARTMENT Q201
COLORADO SPRINGS, CO
 
EQUALIZER WILDLIFE SERVICES
(719) 471-0739
1362 HILLCREST AVENUE
COLORADO SPRINGS, CO
 
A ADVANCED TERMITE PEST
(719) 499-7378
PO Box 18033
Colorado Springs, CO
 
CRAIG'S PEST CONTROL
(719) 471-3067
1340 N Franklin St
Colorado Springs, CO
 
HORTUS LANDSCAPING SERVICE
(719) 473-1138
515 FILLMORE PL
COLORADO SPRINGS, CO
 
ALPINE ANIMAL CONTROL
(719) 636-1014
1362 Hillcrest Ave
Colorado Springs, CO
 
ACADEMY PEST CONTROL LLC
(719) 635-6232
2444 Gunnison St
Colorado Springs, CO
 
JAMES WHIDDEN
(719) 591-0337
PO Box 75065
Colorado Springs, CO
 
ECONOMY TERMITE & PEST CONTROL
(719) 574-2152
4531 E Platte Ave 4
Colorado Springs, CO
 
DO IT YOURSELF PEST CONTROL
(719) 591-0302
2460 N Powers Blvd Ste A
Colorado Springs, CO
 

Fire Ants


Fire ants range in size from 1/8 to 1/3 of an inch, but their bite feels like they're much bigger.

These destructive ants are prevalent across the entire southern tier of the United States, and they're spreading. Along both coasts fire ants have moved as far north as southern Oregon and the Chesapeake Bay.

These pests make conical nests as large as 18 inches in diameter and 10 inches high. If disturbed they attack aggressively, stinging the intruder. They also feed on germinating seeds, young shoots, fruits, and saplings. Like other ants, fire ants nurse aphids on plants, protecting the pests from predators in order to obtain their sweet excrement (honeydew).

Adult fire ants are reddish to dark brown. Winged reproductive forms appear in the spring and early summer. After mating the male dies and the female establishes a new colony. Her first eggs hatch in a week, and the resulting worker ants mature in less than a month. A queen can live several years, producing more than 1,500 eggs per day.

Control

Natural enemies of fire ants have been tested for mass releases that would control the ants in large areas, and progress is being made. Biological control agents include Beauvaria basisanna, a natural fungus disease that attacks fire ants, and beneficial nematodes. Pouring boiling water on individual mounds is effective in small areas.

Photography by USDA

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