Herbal Tea Modesto CA

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Herbal Tea. You will find informative articles about Herbal Tea, including "Herbal Teas" and "Best Herbs for Teas". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Modesto, CA that can help answer your questions about Herbal Tea.

Tea Delights
(209) 566-3885
1407 Standiford
Modesto, CA

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Modesto Farmers Market
(209) 632-9322
16th St. & H St.
Modesto, CA
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
May-November Thursday & Saturday, 7:00 AM- 12:00 PM
County
Stanislaus

Riverbank Farmers Market
(209) 863-7122
Third Street & Sante Fe Street
Riverbank, CA
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : Yes
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
July-September Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.- 8:00 p.m.
County
Stanislaus

Kline Organic Produce
(209) 605-4247
Waterford, CA
Membership Organizations
Ecovian

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Manteca Farmers Market
(209) 823-7229
Library Park
Manteca, CA
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : Yes
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June-August Thursday, 5:00 PM- 8:00 PM
County
San Joaquin

Silver Teapot Tea Parlour & Gift Bouteaque
(209) 824-8700
118 N. Maple Avenue
Manteca, CA

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Oakdale Farmers Market
(209) 632-9322
Hershey's Visitor Center
Modesto, CA
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
May-September Thursday, 5:00 PM- 8:00 PM
County
Stanislaus

Ceres Farmers Market
(209) 537-2979
Ceres Whitmore Park
Ceres, CA
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June-July Tuesday, 5:00 PM- 8:30 PM
County
Stanislaus

Turlock Gourmet CFM
(209) 634-6459
Main & Golden State; Central Park
Turlock, CA
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
May-September Saturday, 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
County
St. Anislaus

Merced Original County Farmers Market
(209) 667-2916
N & 19th Streets; Parking lot
Delhi, CA
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : Yes
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
April-December Saturday, 7:00 AM- 12:00 PM
County
Merced

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Best Herbs for Teas

by Evelyn Gaspar

Once I began blending and testing herb teas to sell under my Garden Party label, I knew what I didn't want. An herb tea should never be flat and flavorless. Whether it's fruity or spicy, soothing or lively, simple or sophisticated, it needs taste and personality.

I found my homegrown mint, lemon balm and chamomile were more flavorful than the herbal ingredients I could buy. I also learned that many of the old-fashioned beverage flavorers, such as rose petals and toasted sunflower hulls, are still delightful additions. And for simple pleasures, few things equal the fragrance and flavor of a few fresh leaves of lemon verbena steeped in boiling water.
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Herbal Teas

by Evelyn Gaspar

Once I began blending and testing herb teas to sell under my Garden Party label, I knew what I didn't want. An herb tea should never be flat and flavorless. Whether it's fruity or spicy, soothing or lively, simple or sophisticated, it needs taste and personality.

I found my homegrown mint, lemon balm and chamomile were more flavorful than the herbal ingredients I could buy. I also learned that many of the old-fashioned beverage flavorers, such as rose petals and toasted sunflower hulls, are still delightful additions. And for simple pleasures, few things equal the fragrance and flavor of a few fresh leaves of lemon verbena steeped in boiling water.

Here are my picks for the most flavorful and widely adapted "tea" plants for home gardens, along with tips for harvesting and my favorite recipes. All of these plants grow well throughout the United States. They are hardy perennials (up to -20°F) that do well in sun or part shade, except where noted.

Bee Balm (Monarda didyma), a member of the mint family, is native to the eastern United States and Canada. Here in the drier West, I pamper it, making sure it's in water-retentive soil. Both the brightly colored flowers and the leaves, with their complex flavors of citrus and spice, are used for tea.

Betony (Stachys officinalis) bears two- to three-foot spikes of violet flowers. The deep green, hairy leaves make a slightly astringent tea that's similar to a mild, fragrant China tea.

Catnip (Nepeta cataria) is a two- to three-foot-tall mint-family member. The fuzzy, scalloped leaves have a lemon-mint flavor. If you have cats, you know they roll in it. My solution: Grow a surplus and dry the leaves on top of the refrigerator where the cats can't reach them. One caution: Pregnant women should avoid drinking catnip tea.

Chamomile bears small, daisy-like flowers that have long been used in Europe for tea. German chamomile (Matricaria recutita) is a two-foot annual. Roman or English chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) is a lush green perennial ground coverms of C. nobile bear small, yellow, button-like flowers. Although many references designate German chamomile as the sweeter type preferred for tea, I harvest the mature flowers of both chamomiles for a light, apple-scented tea.

Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) produces seeds that lend a warm, citrusy flavor to tea. The leaves, used in cooking, are known as cilantro or Chinese parsley. This fast-growing half-hardy annual prefers cool weather. Plant in fall in mild climates; elsewhere, succession-plant through spring and summer.

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) is a three- to five-foot perennial often cultivated as an annual. In cold climates, you can succession-plant through the early spring and summer, and it will often self-sow. Here in the desert, I plant in fall. Fennel likes full sun. Both the feathery leaves and the seeds are used for licorice-flavored teas.

Lemon Balm (Melissa o...

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