Pest Control Cheyenne WY

Identifying insect pests is crucial when doing pest control. Pest control involves knowing which insects are harmful and then dealing with the insect pests. Insecticide should only be used when necessary. Please scroll down for more information and resources that give you access to pest control in Cheyenne, WY listed below.

TOM DIMICK
(307) 772-7500
PO Box 20254
Cheyenne, WY
 
WYOMING STATE GOVERNMENT
(307) 777-6585
2219 CAREY AVE
CHEYENNE, WY
 
PRESTO-X-COMPANY
(307) 635-2544
311 Lexington Ave
Cheyenne, WY
 
ALBANY COUNTY WEED AND PEST
(307) 742-0834
2919 COUNTY SHOP ROAD
LARAMIE, WY
 
TRI-COUNTY SANITATION INC
(307) 859-8830
12930 Us Highway 189-191
Pinedale, WY
 
HIGH PLAINS PROFESSIONAL LURES & PREDATOR CONTROL
(307) 634-9788
7419 WLLSHIRE BOULEVARD
CHEYENNE, WY
 
CHEYENNE TREE SERVICE
(307) 632-3327
PO BOX 21011
CHEYENNE, WY
 
SUBLETTE COUNTY GOVERNMENT WEED & PEST CONTROL
(307) 367-4728
12 S BENCH ROAD
PINEDALE, WY
 
JOHNSON COUNTY WEED & PEST CONTROL
(307) 684-5715
123 FLATIRON DRIVE
BUFFALO, WY
 
COUNTY OF SHERIDAN
(307) 672-3740
PO Box 732
Sheridan, WY
 

Pest Control


A cabbageworm, the larva of a common white butterfly, feeds on the leaves of cabbage, broccoli, and other cole crops.

Insect Control Rule Number 1: Never spray an insecticide until you've identified the culprit. Not all insects are pests -- many are beneficial, most are benign. Don't assume that any insect crawling around on a plant is there to cause trouble. For example, ants on peony buds are harmless.

Tools and Materials

  • notebook
  • magnifying glass
  • camera
  • jar (for collecting samples)
  • insect field guide

If you suspect an insect is causing problems, examine the plant. Check the leaves, top and bottom, looking for insects, caterpillars, and egg masses. As you touch the leaves, watch for scurrying or flying insects. Jot down notes, take a photo, or collect a sample so you can research the possible culprits using a field guide or gardening reference. Wait to spray until you've made a positive ID. Many insecticides will kill not only pests but also beneficial insects, including predatory insects that eat the pests and pollinators like honeybees.

If a plant is struggling, consider non-pest causes first. For example, if you see a wilted plant, check soil moisture. Gardeners sometimes mistake symptoms of nutritional deficiencies -- yellowing leaves, stunting, weak growth, poor production -- as indications of pests. If you see symptoms like these, consider testing your soil nutrients and pH levels.

Types of Insect Pests

Entomologists (insect specialists) often categorize insects by how they feed.

Chewing insects eat leaves. Symptoms include holes, ragged edges, and "skeletonizing" -- eating the tissue between leaf veins. Examples include weevils, caterpillars, flea beetles, and Japanese beetles. Look for the telltale frass (excrement) of the larger of these pests.

Sucking insects pierce a hole in plant tissue and suck out the fluids. Signs include stippling on foliage or silvery bronze leaves and discolored blooms. Examples include spider mites, aphids, thrips, and leafhoppers. These pests often leave behind moltings -- the outer skin they shed as they grow.

Other insects, such as wireworms, feed on roots. Cutworms feed at ground level, girdling young seedlings.

Tips

Once you've identified that you indeed do have a pest problem, determine whether control is really necessary. Is the damage located on the leaves of a plant you'll be harvesting in a week or two? Control measures may not be warranted. However, many pests multiply quickly so keep a close eye on pest populations.

Once you've identified the pest, research its life cycle and habits. Some pests, such as leaf miners that tunnel into plant tissue, will not be affected by sprays. Controls will be more effective if you catch the insect in the most vulnerable part of its life cycle.

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