Trees Boise ID

Bare-root plants are the easiest to buy in plant stores, but it is not possible to buy all species of trees in this form. Buying a tree is hindered by seasonal and location constraints. Here are some gardening tips for the tools and materials you need when planting a tree in a garden. Please read on for more information and resources that give you access to trees in Boise, ID.

Green Ranch
(208) 392-4403
Boise, ID
 
Harrington Farms
(208) 322-4505
Meridian, ID
 
Jayker Wholesale Nursery
(208) 887-1790
Meridian, ID
 
Element Lawns
(208) 953-1456
3100 S. Vista Ave. Ste #200
Boise, ID
Services
Lawn care, Weed Control, Tree & Bush Work, Bug & Pest, Aerating, Landscaping, Lawn Fertilizing, Junk Removal, Sprinklers

Flutterby Gardens Landscaping, LLC
(208) 571-2170
2350 Hill Road
Boise, ID
 
Ball- Edwards Greenhouse
(208) 342-7548
Boise, ID
 
TruGreen
(888) 615-8157
2393 E Commercial St
Meridian, ID
Description
Get 10% off our Lawn Care Package that includes: A Healthy Lawn Analysis customizing a plan to your lawn’s needs, Proactive services provided at key stages throughout the year, Fertilization, Weed Control, & Lawn insect control. For new residential customers only. Not to be combined with or used in conjunction with any other offer or discount including prepayment discount. Additional restrictions may apply. Offer not valid with TruNatural program.
Phone Hours
MON - FRI 9:00AM - 10:00PM; SAT - SUN 9:00AM - 9:00PM

Clayton Tree Farm Nampa
(208) 482-6600
Nampa, ID
 
All Lawns Mowing & Maintenance Inc
(208) 336-1595
6480 West Contractors Street
Boise, ID
Services
Snow Removal Service, Landscaping, tree pruning, rain gutters, sprinkler systems

A & S Lawn Care
(208) 562-0755
4238 Choctaw Way
Boise, ID

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Trees

Buy trees and shrubs bare-root, in containers, or with roots and soil wrapped in burlap. Bare-root plants are the most economical. There's no heavy soil to manage or containers to plant. But bare-root plants, which include only deciduous or otherwise dormant plants such as roses and fruit trees, are usually available only from winter to early spring. You can buy plants in containers and burlap throughout the growing season. Plants in containers are usually the most convenient to purchase but you may compromise the cost, ease of handling, and availability. Plants with roots wrapped in burlap may be heavy and difficult to handle. Here are the steps for planting a tree.

Tools and Materials

Tools and Materials

  • Tape measure
  • Tree or shrub
  • Shovel or spade
  • Water and nozzle
  • Bark or other organic mulch

Site the Tree. Research the mature size of your tree and measure to locate the hole at the proper site. For example, measure a circle 6 feet across, if the plant label says the tree will spread to 6 feet. Note its height in relation to your house, windows, overhead wires, and views. Mark the center of the planting hole where the mature plant can grow without rubbing against buildings or obstructing utilities, traffic, or desirable views.

Dig the hole. Measure the depth and width of the soil in your tree's container. Dig a hole to that depth and two to three times wider. Pile the excavated soil to the side to be used later. Loosen the soil around the sides of the hole to help roots penetrate into the native soil. Don't loosen the soil at the bottom of the hole because the disturbed soil may settle and leave the tree planted too deeply.

Plant the tree. Slip the tree out of its pot or remove the burlap and ties. Prune off only those roots that tightly circle the trunk or are broken. With your hand, loosen and gently spread roots that circle the root ball. Set your tree in the hole, and lay a shovel handle across hole to check the planting depth. The top of the root ball should just touch the shovel handle. Add or remove soil until the top of the root ball is at the appropriate level.

If planting a bare-root tree, shape a small mound of soil in the center of the planting hole, and adjust the tree height until the base of the plant is at the correct level. Spread the roots over the mound of soil without bending or breaking them.

Fill the hole and water. Fill the hole half full with the excavated soil. Water thoroughly and allow to drain. Fill with the remaining soil and rake it gently into a low mound over the planting hole. Pull the soil away from the trunk to form a 4 to 6-inch-high, doughnut-shaped ring around the outside of the planting hole. Water again gently.

If you're planting in very poor soil, or if you are planting a container-grown plant in a lightweight soil mix, amend the excavated soil with 1/3 compost before backfilling.

Mulch your newly planted shrub with 2 to 4 inches of shredded bark to conserve moisture and prevent weeds. Keep the mulch 1 to 2 inches away from the trunk.

Tips

Select trees and shrubs that thrive in your specific soil, sun exposure, and climate. Plants that need moist soil will languish in sandy, dry soil, for example.

Choose shrubs and trees with more than one season of interest. Look for attractive foliage, branching, flowers, fruit, and bark.

Photography by Sabin Gratz/National Gardening Association.

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